Travels & Adventures

Transkei (Part II) South Africa

Continuing on from Part 1 we found ourselves waking up to an overcast sky with the promise of rain. Not to be deterred though, we packed a picnic lunch and took a drive to Coffee Bay. The spiderwebs were sagging in the morning dew, and cows and goats materialized out of clouds of mist on the road. Click on the images to see larger.

The road was rough, but we were able to manoeuvre around the potholes, and enjoyed the Transkei scenery as it floated by with the drizzle. As the morning wore on the rain petered out, we drove over grassy hills and through forested valleys, the wet keeping the roads free of dust.

We arrived at Coffee Bay, and had a coffee (of course!), wandered the beach for the bit, and bought some vetkoek for one Rand at the Bomvu Paradise store. The vetkoek, which are deep fried dough, went well with our coffee. We reminisced a bit of the times we had stayed in Coffee Bay before, and chatted with some of the Backpackers staying at the hostels. Then we were back in the car and headed to our picnic spot at Hole in the Wall.

My Grandfather used to come fishing here, and probably the scenery has not changed much since then. We parked the car and walked down to the river where we unpacked our picnic beneath the trees overlooking the small bay where the waves crash through the hole in the wall.

After lunch and a bit of exploring we drove the 2 hours back to Hluleka, where we enjoyed dinner on our deck overlook the forest. The next morning we woke up to a super sunny day. Not a cloud in the sky. It was a perfect day for swimming and so we headed down to the beach. The water was very clear, and I got a big fright when I startled a sand shark in the shallows. I literally jumped on Milos to get out of the water, and that was the end of our swim, we sunbathed for a while and then headed back for lunch.

After the rain the day before, we found some marvellously huge mushrooms growing in the grass. I don’t know enough about mushrooms to know whether it was poisonous or not, but it did look pretty delicious.

After lunch we decided to go for a hike, we found the hiking footprint sign up on one of the hills behind the houses, and hiked down to the beach a little further up the coast.

The path lead down to some rock pools and we clambered about exploring. There were plenty of interesting creatures living in the pools, and we found quite a few empty crab and crayfish shells. The Transkei is quite well known for its crayfish, and although we didn’t eat any, there was quite a bit of evidence that someone was feasting on them, I’m not sure if it was the local seagulls or people from the village. Also plenty of shed carapaces, so perhaps the population in the reserve is doing quite well!

We were especially excited when Milos found a small eel living in one of the pools.

We spent some time combing the small beaches for treasures, although we didn’t take anything but photographs. The rocks created interesting shapes, and looked very much like swirled lava, with bubbles and cracks.

We hauled ourselves back up the path which was very steep, back up onto the grassy hill and wandered down to a small pond that lay between two hills, hoping to catch sight of some zebra or other interesting creatures.

But found nothing but flowers and reflections, which was not a bad alternative! We headed back home for another relaxing evening!
Part III

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2 thoughts on “Transkei (Part II) South Africa

  1. Pingback: Transkei (Part III) | The Illustrated Adventures of Kat Cameron

  2. Pingback: Transkei I love you (Part I) | The Illustrated Adventures of Kat Cameron

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